STAMP Interns Reflect on Voices of Voting

STAMP Interns Reflect on Voices of Voting

Our interns Connie and Alan share their thoughts about Committee of Seventy’s Voices of Voting, which took place during the DNC:

Coming into the Voices of Voting event, I didn’t know what to expect. I was pleasantly surprised to be taken off of my seat and taken back in time. Throughout the whole play, the characters played an important role in explaining why African Americans worked so hard for their voices to be heard, further uncovering why it is so important for each and everyone of us to go out there and make our voices heard. Most people believe that their voices won’t matter or that one vote wouldn’t make a difference, but many voices that stand together can make a difference and a single vote is what starts the change. Two voices is what builds the momentum and so on until we can’t be stopped. We demand our voices to be heard, one tiny vote can do all of this and more. Before coming to this event, I was on the fence about voting because I felt like I was just a single person and what did it matter if I voted. However, after this play, I was convinced that I had to be apart of the movement and vote. Philadelphia is one of the biggest influences. When the people of Philadelphia speak up, it is seen nationwide, making a statement that no one can deny; this play made me want to be a part of that. – Connie

 
Voices of Voting was an intriguing and insightful play, depicting the struggles and history behind voting rights for African Americans and how important it is for your voice to be heard. It started off abruptly and it quite confused me, but later I understood. The three actors switch between other characters in regards to the time period that they switch into. They switched between characters that had a burning desire to have their voice heard as well as characters who simply blindly accepted the reality of their disenfranchisement. It was a story for everyone; it promotes voting as a way of self expression, especially among teens. Before coming to this event, I didn’t have an interest in voting since I will not be eligible to vote, and I also didn’t have an expectation that had to be met. – Alan